Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Mingo Sanders Picture Found!


The following picture of Mingo Sanders was found on page 160 of the book The Brownsville Raid by John D. Weaver. Unfortunately, the book does not give any information about where the photo came from, or when it was taken.

Taking a look at the Fort Snelling photo (1883) of Company B, 25th Infantry, the person who most closely resembles Sanders, in my opinion, is shown to the left. In both photos the man's complexion looks very dark and in both the skin appears tightly drawn across his face. Guessing that Sanders in the baseball picture is in his late forties dates that photo somewhere around the 1900s. The entire Fort Snelling photo can be see in the blog entry "Is There a Picture of Mingo Sanders?" The cropped Bicycle Corps photo in the same entry is too grainy to make much of a comparison.

The man on the magazine cover almost certainly is Mingo Sanders. The picture, drawn by W.A. Rogers, appeared on the cover of Harper's Weekly on January 12, 1907. The cartoon portrays a dejected soldier from the 25th Infantry who has been dishonorably discharged by President Theodore Roosevelt following the Brownsville Affair. Sanders gained national attention when he, along with 166 other soldiers of the 25th, was booted from the Army. This was President Roosevelt's solution when it could not be determined who shot up the town of Brownsville, Texas one August night in 1906. Racist townspeople blamed the soldiers at nearby Fort Brown. Sanders was the star witnesses for the defense because of his impeccable twenty-six years of service. His name was on the front page of many national papers while a Senate investigation was held.

Click here for more about Sanders.


The picture to the left shows an old soldier with nearly thirty years service. His medals tell us he is "One of the best", "faithful", "brave" and "honest"--all words that were used to describe Sanders.

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Another New Picture Found

I just found another picture of the Bicycle Corps that I've never seen. This appears to be from the Yellowstone trip of 1896. It comes from an article Moss wrote for the February 1897 edition of Outing magazine.